Llevo 20 años en Málaga y no pude votar contra el ‘Brexit’, por eso he venido

Llevo 20 años en Málaga y no pude votar contra el ‘Brexit’, por eso he venido

La manifestación convocada por la plataforma cívica ‘People’s Vote’ reunió ayer en Londres a más de un millón de personas para reclamar la celebración de un segundo referéndum del ‘Brexit’.

A la cita no quisieron faltar un nutrido grupo de británicos residentes en la provincia, algunos de los cuales no pudo votar en el referéndum en el que se aprobó la salida de Reino Unido de la Unión de Europea por llevar más de 15 años fuera del país. Este fue el caso de Theresa O’Shea, que lleva 20 años viviendo en Macharaviaya.

Me alegro de haber venido. Ha merecido la pena. No pude votar en su día porque llevo 20 años residiendo fuera de Reino Unido, lo que considero una gran injusticia en un asunto que nos afecta tanto y en el no tuvimos el derecho de votar en las urnas. Ahora he querido hacerlo con mi presencia en esta manifestación, estar aquí me ha servido para darme cuenta de que formo parte de una gran familia europea», declaró O’Shea, que realizó todo el recorrido envuelta en una bandera de la UE.

Tampoco quisieron faltar a la convocatoria los miembros de la asociación ‘Bremain in Spain’, uno de los colectivos de la marcha desde España y que portaron una pancarta en la que se podía leer: «Give us a voice. Give us a vote. Give us a… FinalSay» (es español «Danos una voz. Danos un voto, Danos un… final»).

Full article in Diario Sur

British residents in Malaga travel to London for the Put it to the People march

British residents in Malaga travel to London for the Put it to the People march

Numerous Brits living in Malaga will be among at least 100 UK residents in Spain travelling to London for Saturday’s Put it to the People march, to call on the government to give the UK population another chance to vote on Brexit.

It is expected to be the biggest anti-Brexit demonstration to date and hundreds of thousands of protesters will be calling for a people’s vote. For many this is a “now or never” moment to get their voices heard, with less than a week before the date set by the British government for the UK to leave the EU, and with parliament voting against a second referendum but in favour of extending Article 50 last week.

Bremain in Spain chair, Sue Wilson said in a press release this week, “If Theresa May can keep asking parliament the same question, how can she deny the public a second chance?”

Read full story in The Sur

Brexit: Madrid to host protest to demand People’s Vote

Brexit: Madrid to host protest to demand People’s Vote

In London on Saturday, just six days before Britain is (currently) scheduled to leave the European Union, hundreds of thousands of people are expected to take to the streets to demand that the public is given a final say on any Brexit deal.

The “Put It To The People March” will begin at noon on Park Lane for a march to Parliament Square.

Among those leading the calls for for a People’s Vote will be Britons resident in Spain, with a large contingent flying over to London especially for the event – among them members of Bremain in Spain.

Sue Wilson, chair of Bremain in Spain, will be flying over to join the march to Westminster along with around 100 members of the campaign group.. “We’ve supported the campaign for another referendum from the start, and we’ve actively campaigned to give the British public another say in this debate. The Brexit that was sold was a lie, a fantasy, a pipe-dream. The British public deserves a chance to think again.”

“The June 2016 referendum result started a Brexit nightmare for UK citizens living in the EU and EU citizens living in the EU. Since then, we’ve been working together to make our voices heard. We’ve been side-lined and silenced for too long. On Saturday, we’ll be loud and proud and demanding
another referendum. Although most of us couldn’t vote on our own futures in June 2016, and it’s unlikely that we’ll be able to vote in the next referendum, we wholeheartedly support a #PeoplesVote.”

Wilson concludes: “The public must be able to make an informed decision based on the facts, not the fantasy. We must establish if Brexit really is the ‘will of the people’ before making this momentous decision. It’s the only way forward that can start to heal the divisions created by Brexit. If Theresa May can keep asking parliament the same question, how can she deny the public a second chance? As our new banner says: we want a voice, a vote and a final say, because Brexit is bonkers!”

Read the full article in The Local

Expat pro-EU remain group considering appeal against High Court Brexit referendum case dismissal

Expat pro-EU remain group considering appeal against High Court Brexit referendum case dismissal

A COSTA BLANCA-based group of British expatriates campaigning to remain in the EU have said they are considering appealing against High Court ruling on the legality of the Brexit referendum.

Bremain in Spain, part of the UK in EU group, said it would appeal against the dismissal of their court appeal for judicial review after the judge called it “hopeless”.

Mr Justice Ouseley presided over the hearings which were launched after Britain’s Electoral Commission ruled the Vote Leave organisation had broken campaign spending laws.

Susan Wilson, lead claimant in the case and head of Bremain in Spain, said she was disappointed with the ruling.

“The government has aggressively countered our claims and has shown a blatant disregard for democratic values,” Wilson said.

Read full article in the Euro Weekly News

The Leave campaign broke the rules – there’s the justification for a Final Say, prime minister

The Leave campaign broke the rules – there’s the justification for a Final Say, prime minister

As the parliamentary debate on the withdrawal agreement progresses, the call for a people’s vote becomes increasingly irresistible. A case in the High Court (Wilson and others v the prime minister) offers another argument in its favour: the government has a constitutional duty to at least re-consider whether it should proceed with Brexit.

All public bodies are subject to a legal duty, whenever they make a decision, to take all relevant considerations into account. This duty applies at every level, from district councils through to the prime minister. Where a public body fails to take a relevant consideration into account, its decision can be set aside.

The conduct of the Leave campaigns during the 2016 referendum is just such a relevant consideration. The Electoral Commission has found that Vote Leave incorrectly reported its spending and, in fact, exceed its spending limit by nearly 10 per cent. Spending limits are put in place to ensure that no side can “buy” an election. When Vote Leave exceeded its spending limit it gave itself, and by extension the entire Leave campaign, a significant unfair advantage. The Electoral Commission also found that Darren Grimes, founder of BeLeave misreported donations from Vote Leave and the campaign group “Veterans for Britain” also broke electoral rules. Grimes has denied any wrongdoing and is appealing the fine.

 
Organisations associated with the Leave side have also been fined by the information commissioner. The commissioner found that Leave.EU and Eldon Insurance, a company owned by Arron Banks, misused data belonging to Eldon’s customers and illegally sent 300,000 emails.
 
Full article in The Independent